Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

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HotMJ!
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Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by HotMJ! » Wed Sep 07, 2005 1:37 am

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main ... do0602.xml

The Big Easy rocked, but didn't roll

The Big Easy when the going gets difficult

......................

Consider the signature image of the flood: an aerial shot of 255 school buses neatly parked at one city lot, their fuel tanks leaking gasoline into the urban lake. An enterprising blogger, Bryan Preston, worked out that each bus had 66 seats, which meant that the vehicles at just that one lot could have ferried out 16,830 people. Instead of entrusting its most vulnerable citizens to the gang-infested faecal hell of the Superdome, New Orleans had more than enough municipal transport on hand to have got almost everyone out in a couple of runs last Sunday.

Why didn't they? Well, the mayor didn't give the order. OK, but how about school board officials, or the fellows with the public schools transportation department, or the guy who runs that motor pool, or the individual bus drivers? If it ever occurred to any of them that these were potentially useful evacuation assets, they kept it to themselves.

.............

On 9/11, the federal government failed the people; last week, local and state government failed the people. On 9/11, they stuck to the 30-year-old plan; last week, they didn't bother implementing the state-of-the-art 21st-century plan. Why argue about which level of bureaucracy you prefer to be let down by?

My mistake was to think that the citizenry of the Big Easy would rise to the great rallying cry of Todd Beamer: "Are you ready, guys? Let's roll!" Instead, the spirit of the week was summed up by a gentleman called Mike Franklin, taking time out of his hectic schedule of looting to speak to the Associated Press: "People who are oppressed all their lives, man, it's an opportunity to get back at society."

Unlike 9/11, when the cult of victimhood was temporarily suspended in honour of the many real, actual victims under the rubble, in New Orleans everyone claimed the mantle of victim, from the incompetent mayor to the "oppressed" guys wading through the water with new DVD players under each arm.

.....................



:nonono:

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Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by abbymjgirl » Thu Sep 08, 2005 9:31 pm

I cannot even look at the news anymore. I do but I start to tear up. :bluecry:

So, so, so sad..I wish I could do more.

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Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by HotMJ! » Sun Sep 11, 2005 5:35 am

:nonono:

WHERE WERE THE BUSES?


When the mayor of New Orleans criticizes the federal government for not planning or responding quickly enough to the hurricane, he might want to take a look at this picture:


255 SCHOOL BUSES sitting in a New Orleans parking lot
Image


These buses could have been used for a mass evacuation of people without cars Saturday and Sunday before Katrina hit. Yet they are now partially submerged and of little or no use.

I also recall that President Bush had to URGE the same mayor to evacuate the city, as he was kind of paralyzed by the prospect of Katrina blowing into his city.

Simply amazing!

C Buskuhl


http://www.steynonline.com/index2.cfm?edit_id=66

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Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by HotMJ! » Sun Sep 11, 2005 5:54 am

:extremely

EVERYBODY COULD HAVE GOT OUT!

In Mark Steyn's Telegraph article, he wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main ... do0602.xml

...Consider the signature image of the flood: an aerial shot of 255 school buses neatly parked at one city lot, their fuel tanks leaking gasoline into the urban lake. An enterprising blogger, Bryan Preston, worked out that each bus had 66 seats, which meant that the vehicles at just that one lot could have ferried out 16,830 people. Instead of entrusting its most vulnerable citizens to the gang-infested faecal hell of the Superdome, New Orleans had more than enough municipal transport on hand to have got almost everyone out in a couple of runs last Sunday.

Why didn't they? Well, the mayor didn't give the order. OK, but how about school board officials, or the fellows with the public schools transportation department, or the guy who runs that motor pool, or the individual bus drivers? If it ever occurred to any of them that these were potentially useful evacuation assets, they kept it to themselves.


In light of this, I think the following comment made by one of Steve Sailer's readers and re-posted to his blog,* might be interesting:


* http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/reme ... arked.html

One might ask the following question. On election day the state and local Democrats with admirable efficiency and organization manage to have fleets of buses and vans at those now flooded housing projects to get their constituents to the polls. So where were they for the three days while the storm was bearing down on the city?

-Peter T Chattaway



255 SCHOOL BUSES sitting in a New Orleans parking lot
Image
http://www.steynonline.com/index2.cfm?edit_id=66

freakcircusfreak2

Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by freakcircusfreak2 » Mon Sep 12, 2005 4:08 pm

Catastrophe Resulted in Affirmative Inaction

By Julianne Malveaux, BET.com Contributing Columnist

Posted Sept. 6, 2005 -- The concept of a level playing field has been drowned by the same fetid water under which the city of New Orleans is submerged.
The notion of equality, of equal protection under the law, has been shattered by a week of harrowing images of African-American people crowded into the New Orleans Superdome like slaves crushed into the hull of a ship.

When politicians are moved to profanity and tears because the federal government has turned its back on them, what are the rest of us to do? When normally unflappable news anchors are moved to angry and biting sarcasm, where is the notion of impartiality? And is this about race, class, stupidity or incompetence? Does it even matter?

The Rev. T.D. Jakes was apparently practicing for his photo op with George W. Bush when he took to the airwaves to say that the government’s indifference to people in New Orleans was about disorganization, not racism.

But the disorganization begins with having a former horse trader with no qualifications head up FEMA, the federal agency that manages the response to national disasters. Michael Brown was actually briefed on air by news anchors and admitted that he did not know what was going on. New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said that he didn’t know because he preferred to stay in air-conditioned Washington than to come to New Orleans and see the carnage for himself. When such a bumbler is put in charge of a disaster agency, and when the agency is weakened because it is submerged into the Department of Homeland Security, there is a prescription for disaster.

Disorganization has different consequences for different people. Those who had cash, credit cards and automobiles were able to evacuate New Orleans. Those who were hard hit, at the end of the month, and had nothing, were stuck. In a city that is two-thirds Black and disproportionately poor (it has a poverty rate of about 30 percent, compared to the national rate of 12.7 percent), disorganization had deleterious consequences for African-American people. While the disorganization may have had no evil intent, it had an absolutely evil outcome. And given the known vulnerability of the poor population in New Orleans, a disorganized response to a Category 5 storm was a death sentence for thousands of people.

We have moved troops and dropped meals to Bosnia and Iraq within 48 hours, but it took five days for the people of New Orleans to get help. Why? The President was doing a fair imitation of the Roman emperor Nero, fiddling while his nation burned. The FEMA head was clueless. Would the President have responded more quickly if the images flashing across the television screen were of vulnerable White people? In my opinion, absolutely.

A complicating factor in all of this has been the subtle and overt racism in the media. When hungry folks take food from flooded grocery stores, that’s called survival, not looting. When people, who are strapping cardboard to their feet because all of their possessions have been swept away, go into a store and take shoes, that, too, is called survival. The calls for zero tolerance for looting were absurd, and the images of Black people “looting” (along with the more benign images of White people “finding” food) fanned the flames of every racial stereotype there is. Then rabidly conservative talk show hosts — Bill O’Reilly and Tucker Carlson among them — piled it on by foaming at the mouth about looters while ignoring the conditions even George Bush called “unacceptable.”

The media compounded their offense by repeatedly referring to hurricane victims as "refugees.” They may be “evacuees,” but refugees are people fleeing to foreign lands, not American citizens and taxpayers in distress. The notion of “one nation” has been washed out by the tide of disparate treatment of hurricane survivors. In the face of tragedy and terrorism, we are often told that all Americans are “in the same boat,” even if some of us are riding and others rowing. But if there is only one boat, there was no room in the boat for thousands of Black and poor New Orleanians. Some ride, some row, and some drown. And our national leadership threw out life preservers well after the fact. So much for the notion of a level playing field. Those who oppose affirmative action practiced a deadly form of affirmative inaction in the first week after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans.

http://www.bet.com/Site+Management/Pack ... B8420CA2A1}

freakcircusfreak2

Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by freakcircusfreak2 » Mon Sep 12, 2005 4:14 pm

'Is It Darfur Yet?'

By Askia Muhammad

Posted Sept. 2, 2005 -- Here I go, playing the “race card” again.
But I can’t see the neglect of tens of thousands of victims of Hurricane Katrina-battered New Orleans, who are still trapped in that cesspool of toxic industrial waste, heavy metals, and human and animal carcasses, that was once the proud Crescent City, through any prism except the racial lens.

Watching the horror of helpless, dying people with no food or water huddled in makeshift shelters, looks worse than what we see coming from the refugee camps in Darfur, in Western Sudan. U.S. officials have labeled that carnage “genocide.”

Is New Orleans Darfur yet?

Never mind all the missed warning signals, even last year’s dress rehearsal in New Orleans of just such a catastrophic event as occurred this week. Never mind that these desperate American citizens–whose sons and daughters, fathers and husbands, and mothers and wives are fighting and dying at this moment in Iraq and Afghanistan. They are referred to openly as “refugees,” as though they fled from some alien country and are therefore less deserving of all available urgent domestic assistance.

What’s most disturbing to me is that the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) admitted on CNN that until Thursday afternoon, he didn’t even know that 15,000 evacuees were sweltering in 90-degree heat with no water, no toilets, and with dead decomposing bodies all around them at the New Orleans Convention Center. And another FEMA official told NBC that they were distracted for a time at the agency with concerns about stopping the looting that was going on, rather than with a sense of urgent compassion for the growing number of victims.

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus could barely conceal their rage at a Friday news conference. “We cannot allow it to be said by history, that the difference between those who lived and those who died in this great storm and flood of 2005, was nothing more than poverty, age or skin color,” former CBC Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) told reporters.

But when I asked Republican Whip Roy Blount of Missouri, what the White Congressional leadership could say to comfort uneasy Black people who see a sea of suffering Black faces–and practically only Black faces–still stuck in quagmire. He quibbled with me that the victims may “primarily” be Black, but are not exclusively Black. Now is the time to relieve the suffering, this is no time for finger-pointing, the Republican leadership is quick to point out.

Maybe not. Maybe it’s time for a Security Council to step in. Because it looks to me like U.S. politicians who were so put-out about “looters,” are blinded by the same vision of “welfare queens in Cadillacs” that haunted the political discourse a generation ago. I would remind our policy makers in Congress and the executive branch that these “looters” we have seen so often on the screens, are not “enemy combatants.” They are not members of Al-Qaeda. They are Americans, desperate Americans who are facing death, and they don’t like what they see.

Author and scholar Askia Muhammad is the editor of the Black Journalism Review.
http://www.bet.com/Site+Management/Pack ... B8420CA2A1}

freakcircusfreak2

Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by freakcircusfreak2 » Mon Sep 12, 2005 4:19 pm

Dear Mr. Bush:

Any idea where all our helicopters are? It's Day 5 of Hurricane Katrina and thousands remain stranded in New Orleans and need to be airlifted. Where on earth could you have misplaced all our military choppers? Do you need help finding them? I once lost my car in a Sears parking lot. Man, was that a drag.

Also, any idea where all our national guard soldiers are? We could really use them right now for the type of thing they signed up to do like helping with national disasters. How come they weren't there to begin with?

Last Thursday I was in south Florida and sat outside while the eye of Hurricane Katrina passed over my head. It was only a Category 1 then but it was pretty nasty. Eleven people died and, as of today, there were still homes without power. That night the weatherman said this storm was on its way to New Orleans. That was Thursday! Did anybody tell you? I know you didn't want to interrupt your vacation and I know how you don't like to get bad news. Plus, you had fundraisers to go to and mothers of dead soldiers to ignore and smear. You sure showed her!

I especially like how, the day after the hurricane, instead of flying to Louisiana, you flew to San Diego to party with your business peeps. Don't let people criticize you for this -- after all, the hurricane was over and what the heck could you do, put your finger in the dike?

And don't listen to those who, in the coming days, will reveal how you specifically reduced the Army Corps of Engineers' budget for New Orleans this summer for the third year in a row. You just tell them that even if you hadn't cut the money to fix those levees, there weren't going to be any Army engineers to fix them anyway because you had a much more important construction job for them -- BUILDING DEMOCRACY IN IRAQ!

On Day 3, when you finally left your vacation home, I have to say I was moved by how you had your Air Force One pilot descend from the clouds as you flew over New Orleans so you could catch a quick look of the disaster. Hey, I know you couldn't stop and grab a bullhorn and stand on some rubble and act like a commander in chief. Been there done that.

There will be those who will try to politicize this tragedy and try to use it against you. Just have your people keep pointing that out. Respond to nothing. Even those pesky scientists who predicted this would happen because the water in the Gulf of Mexico is getting hotter and hotter making a storm like this inevitable. Ignore them and all their global warming Chicken Littles. There is nothing unusual about a hurricane that was so wide it would be like having one F-4 tornado that stretched from New York to Cleveland.

No, Mr. Bush, you just stay the course. It's not your fault that 30 percent of New Orleans lives in poverty or that tens of thousands had no transportation to get out of town. C'mon, they're black! I mean, it's not like this happened to Kennebunkport. Can you imagine leaving white people on their roofs for five days? Don't make me laugh! Race has nothing -- NOTHING -- to do with this!

You hang in there, Mr. Bush. Just try to find a few of our Army helicopters and send them there. Pretend the people of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are near Tikrit.


Yours,


Michael Moore

MMFlint@aol.com

www.MichaelMoore.com


P.S. That annoying mother, Cindy Sheehan, is no longer at your ranch. She and dozens of other relatives of the Iraqi War dead are now driving across the country, stopping in many cities along the way. Maybe you can catch up with them before they get to DC on September 2

freakcircusfreak2

Hurrican Katrina Coverage/Video

Post by freakcircusfreak2 » Mon Sep 12, 2005 4:29 pm

Embattled FEMA Director Mike Brown Resigns

WASHINGTON - Federal Emergency Management Agency director Mike Brown said Monday he has resigned "in the best interest of the agency and best interest of the president," three days after losing his onsite command of the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.

Brown, under fire for FEMA's performance in the Gulf Coast, said he feared he had become a distraction.

"The focus has got to be on FEMA, what the people are trying to do down there," Brown told The Associated Press.

His decision was not a surprise. Brown was abruptly recalled to Washington on Friday, a clear vote of no confidence from his superiors at the White House and the Homeland Security Department. Brown had been roundly criticized for FEMA's sluggish response to the hurricane, which has caused political problems for Bush and fellow Republicans. He also was accused of padding his resume, which Brown denied Friday.

The president ducked questions about Brown's resignation. "Maybe you know something I don't know. I've been working," the president said to reporters on an inspection tour of damage in Gulfport, Miss. Bush said he planned to talk with Brown's boss, Homeland Security Director Michael Chertoff, from Air Force One on the flight back to Washington.

"There will be plenty of time to figure out what went right and what went wrong," Bush said.

Polls show most Americans believe Bush could have done more to help Katrina's victims, though they also blame leaders of Louisiana and New Orleans. Bush's overall job approval rating is at the lowest point of his presidency.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi called Brown's departure long overdue.

"His resignation is the right thing for the country and for the people of the Gulf Coast states," she said in a statement.

Brown, who said he last talked to Bush five or six days ago, said the resignation was his idea. He spoke Saturday to White House chief of staff Andy Card, who did not request his departure, according to Brown.

"I'm turning in my resignation today," Brown said. "I think it's in the best interest of the agency and the best interest of the president to do that and get the media focused on the good things that are going on, instead of me."

Shortly after Brown was recalled to Washington last week, officials close to the FEMA director said he would probably resign. They said that even before Katrina, Brown had been planning on leaving the administration late this fall to go into the private sector.

___

Associated Press writers Jennifer Loven in Mississippi and Lara Jakes Jordan in Washington contributed to this report.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050912/ap_ ... MlJVRPUCUl

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